Part 43 of CASR Maintenance of aircraft in private and aerial work operations

Rule status

Proposed

Part 43 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations (CASR) will set out the rules for the maintenance of aircraft engaged in private and aerial work operations. It is expected to be made in 2023.

The rule aims to maintain appropriate levels of safety and minimise the regulatory burden on general aviation and keep compliance costs as low as possible.

The Aviation Maintenance Technician provisions will provide a clear and defined pathway to aviation business opportunities for unlicensed individuals with valuable skills.

Part 43 of CASR will not apply to aircraft carrying out air transport operations under Parts 121, 133 or 135.

The part will also not apply to:

  • sport and recreational aviation operations - Part 103 of CASR
  • balloons and hot airship - Part 131 of CASR.

Who it affects

Part 43 of affects:

  • registered aircraft owners and pilots
  • maintainers of Part 43 aircraft.

What is changing, staying the same or being removed

The following table outlines what the main differences are.

  • CASA Certificate of Approval (COA) for maintenance organisations maintaining only Part 43 aircraft
  • you will not require a type rating (if task-based competency has already been established)
  • the unique Australian Maintenance Release (MR)
  • Schedule 5 of CAR Generic maintenance schedule
  • Schedule 6 of CAR System of certification
  • unique Australian maintenance airworthiness directives (ADs) including:
    • AD/ENG/4
    • AD/ENG/5
    • AD/PROP/1
    • AD/GENERAL/87.

Part 43 only requires inspection schedules and compliance with AWLs and applicable ADs.

  • a clear separation of maintenance from continuing airworthiness management
  • more flexibility for minor modifications and repairs using acceptable data
  • task-based competency assessment for LAMEs to gain privileges
  • clear safety standards based on Part 21 of CASR certification basis
  • an Inspection Authorisation. A new authorisation to certify annual inspections and compliance of major modifications and repairs, issued to the holder of an aircraft maintenance engineer licence
  • maintenance authorisations (for example welding authorities) to transition to aircraft maintenance technician certificates
  • inspection based standards.
  • the registered operator remains responsible for ensuring the aircraft is airworthy
  • you are still require to keep maintenance records
  • you are still required to use data, facilities, tools and equipment for maintenance. However there is broad flexibility regarding the sourcing and allowable substitution of data, tools and equipment.
Extra Body field:

Responsibility of a registered operator

If you are the owner of an aircraft, you become the registered operator (RO) by default. This applies unless you appoint another person to be the registered operator in your place and notify us of the appointment.

As the registered operator of a Part 43 aircraft, you are responsible for:

  • the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft
  • keeping records of the aircraft and its maintenance. You cannot operate an aircraft unless you keep completed records of maintenance and the aircraft is approved for return to service
  • reporting major defects.

The RO must elect to use Part 43 and select an inspection schedule for the aircraft. The rules provide the RO with several inspection schedule options, depending on the complexity and certification basis of their aircraft. These are:

  • annual inspection based on Schedule 1 of the Manual of Standards (MOS)
  • an annual inspection based on the aircraft manufacturers schedule
  • progressive inspection as detailed in Schedule 2 of the MOS
  • an Approved Inspection Program (AIP).

The RO of an aerial work aircraft is also responsible for approving pilots to carry out preventive and pilot maintenance on their aircraft.

Maintainer of a Part 43 aircraft

If you are providing maintenance services under Part 43, you will be able to provide most maintenance services for small non-complex aircraft used in:

  • private operations
  • aerial work operations.

You are also able to certify these maintenance services under the scope of their Part 66 licence without holding a certificate of approval which is required under the current rules. Part 43 will provide direct benefits to these businesses through reduced costs and increased flexibility.

If you hold a B1 or B2 licence, you can provide maintenance services according to the applicable privileges, conditions, and limitations under:

  • your Part 66 of CASR licence
  • the additional privileges, limitations, and conditions to be set out in Part 43 Manual of Standards and detailed in the Plain English Guide
  • regulations 11.056, 11.067 or 11.068 of CASR (general conditions about granting authorisations).

When providing maintenance services, you will not require a type rating to exercise your licence privileges.

Inspection Authorisations

Under Part 43 there will be 2 types of Inspection Authorisations (IA):

  • Mechanical – B1 LAME
  • Avionics – B2 LAME.

Mechanical IA

To apply for a mechanical IA, you must have:

  • held a Part 66 of CASR B1 licence for 3 years
  • exercised privileges of that licence for 2 years
  • successfully complete a training course approved by us or hold a
    • FAA or PNG CAA or NZCAA inspection authorisation
    • CASA Certificate of airworthiness delegation.

Avionics IA

To apply for an Avionics IA, you must have:

  • held a Part 66 of CASR B2 licence for 3 years
  • exercised the privileges of their licence for 2 years.

No IA training course is required.

Once granted, an IA will remain in force for a period of 5 years.

Aircraft maintenance technician certificate

An aircraft maintenance technician certificate (AMTC) is an individual authorisation to perform or supervise certain maintenance, and approve it for return to service, of:

  • aircraft
  • engine
  • propeller
  • aeronautical product.

Under Part 43, 5 classes of AMTC will be available. This includes:

  • AMTC1 for specialised maintainers of type certificated aircraft and aeronautical products
  • AMTC2 for primary builders of amateur-built aircraft and experimental LSA
  • AMTC3 for inspectors of amateur-built aircraft and experimental LSA
  • AMTC4 for maintainers of LSA 
  • AMTC 5 for maintainers of warbird, historical and replica (WHR) aircraft.

Transition periods

The following transition periods for Part 43 will apply:

  • 12 months for maintenance authorisations holders to transition to aircraft maintenance technician certificates
  • 36 months for CAR 30 maintenance organisations to become either a:
    • Part 43 (only) maintenance business
    • transition to a Part 145 approved maintenance organisation. Please note: this timeframe will be reviewed to align with the Air Transport Continuing Airworthiness project.

Legislative instruments

Legislative instruments include exemptions to regulatory requirements in aviation regulations or a Manual of Standards.

Exemptions may apply to a broad range of people.

Instruments related to this part will display in this space or you can view our list of legislative instruments.

Non-legislative instruments

Non-legislative instruments apply to a particular person. There are some exemptions to regulatory requirements in aviation regulations or a Manual of Standards listed here.

Non-legislative Instruments related to this part will display in this space or you can view our list of non-legislative instruments.

Guidance material

Advisory material provides advice and guidance to explain particular regulatory requirements of a CASR Part. Guidance material relating to this part will appear in this space or you can view all our guidance material.

Supporting resources

Supporting resources related to this part will appear in this space. These are used in conjunction to support the formal guidance material listed above.

22 supporting resources available

Learn more about what you should consider when planning to make an aircraft maintained under Part 43 available for air transport operations.

Learn more about maintenance/retirement intervals under the proposed general aviation maintenance regulations (Part 43 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR)) and the Part 43 Manual of Standards.

Once the general aviation maintenance regulations (CASR Part 43) is made and commences the new set of rules will provide for the maintenance of Amateur-built and Light Sport aircraft by individuals other than LAMEs and AMOs.

Learn more about the maintenance activities an approved maintenance organisation (CAR 30 or Part 145) may perform once Part 43 is made and commences.

Learn more about dealing with manufacturers service bulletins once Part 43 is made and commences.

Learn more about the role of the B1 Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (LAME) once Part 43 is made and commences.

Learn more about the maintenance activities an approved maintenance organisation (CAR 30 or Part 145) may perform once Part 43 is made and commences.

Learn more about the role of the B2 Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (LAME) once Part 43 is made and commences.

When the opportunity presented itself in the mid-1990s, transitioning to the new general aviation maintenance rules was a no brainer for a New Zealand (NZ) based maintenance provider.

Learn more about inspection authorisations and how they will be issued once Part 43 is made and commences.

Learn more about the maintenance of warbirds, historical and replica aircraft under the proposed general aviation maintenance regulations (Part 43 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR) and the Part 43 Manual of Standards (MOS)).

Learn more about overhauling piston engines once Part 43 is made and commences.

Learn more about the requirements for approving aircraft or aeronautical products for an aircraft for return to service under the proposed general aviation maintenance regulations (Part 43 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR) and the Part 43 Manual of Standards (MOS)).

Learn more about the inspections for aircraft being operated in private or aerial work once Part 43 is made and commences.

This information sheet provides general guidance about things to consider when buying and importing a foreign aircraft for use in private or aerial work operations, a limited category aircraft, or any other aircraft to which Part 43 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR) will apply.

Learn more about the initial annual inspection on an aircraft once Part 43 is made and commences.

Learn more about the requirements to maintain records for an aircraft being operated in private or aerial work and other aircraft to which the proposed general aviation regulations (Part 43 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR)) and the Part 43 Manual of Standards will apply.

Learn more about supervised task performance once Part 43 is made and commences.

Learn more about the use of manufacturer’s maintenance instructions and manufacturer’s recommended inspection schedules under the proposed general aviation maintenance regulations (Part 43 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR)) and the Part 43 Manual of Standards.

Learn more about how aircraft maintenance technician certificates will work in practice once Part 43 is made and commences.

Learn more about dealing with defects in aircraft, or in aeronautical products for aircraft, under the proposed general aviation maintenance regulations (Part 43 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR)) and the Part 43 Manual of Standards.

Learn more about how Part 43 will apply to an amateur-built aircraft once the regulation is made and commences.

Last updated date
Updated:
Online version available at: https://www.casa.gov.au//rules/regulatory-framework/casr/part-43-casr-maintenance-aircraft-private-and-aerial-work-operations
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