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CASA Annual Report 2004-05 - Part 3: Corporate Report

Part 3: Corporate Report

Stakeholder Relationships

Aviation Safety Forum

The Aviation Safety Forum is a consultative body, which advises CASA on strategic issues associated with regulation of the aviation industry and on certain aspects of CASA's operations. This advice may be sought by CASA or put forward by the Forum itself.

The Aviation Safety Forum is broadly representative of stakeholders in the aviation community. Members provide expert input based on their extensive backgrounds in passenger transport, engineering, general aviation, aviation consumer issues and as Officers of Airservices Australia and the Department of Defence.

The Department of Transport and Regional Services sends an observer to meetings.

Membership of the Aviation Safety Forum was expanded in 2004-2005 to bring in new expertise and fresh insights including governance and strategic guidance.

The Aviation Safety Forum met four times in 2004-05.

Some of the key issues the Forum addressed and advised CASA or the Minister on during the reporting period were:

  • development of CASA's Corporate Plan
  • CASA's cost recovery and long-term funding arrangements
  • The CASA audit programme
  • The CASA Aviation Safety programme; and
  • The consistency and quality of regulatory decisions undertaken by CASA.

Further information about the ASF (including its membership, sub-committees, meeting agendas and reports) is provided on CASA's web site at www.casa.gov.au

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During the reporting period, three new members have joined the Aviation Safety Forum, the high-level consultative body which works with CASA to improve aviation safety in Australia.

Robyn Beetham, Adrian Verkerk and Rob Graham have joined the group of 15 people which meets at least four times a year to advise CASA on strategic issues.

Robyn joins the forum having held positions such as Assistant Secretary, Aviation Industry Branch and First Assistant Secretary, Aviation Division in the Department of Transport and Regional Services.

She also held senior positions in agriculture and rail, and several positions on national transport-related advisory committees, including the Aviation Y2K Committee, the Aviation Industry Forum and the Global Navigation Satellite System Consultative Committee.

As well as being a member of the Aviation Safety Forum, Robyn is also on the Weapons Material Governance board which advises the Department of Defence on project governance issues.

She is also a member of the Safeskies board and Chair of the ACT and Southern NSW section of the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport. Robyn comes to the ASF with a keen interest in regulatory development based on efficient and effective outcomes.

Adrian Verkerk is Head of Engineering and Maintenance for Qantas Airlines, and is responsible for fleet management and airworthiness matters, as well as holding the position of Maintenance Controller.

After graduating from Sydney University with a degree in aeronautical engineering, Adrian spent 10 years in the design Office of Hawker de Havilland Australia, working on a wide range of mechanical systems projects for military aircraft.

He joined Qantas in 1988 and since then has worked in various engineering roles, progressing from mechanical systems, powerplant engineering, maintenance contracts management, technical training management and airworthiness compliance to his current position.

Rob Graham trained as a pilot in the United Kingdom before coming to Australia and working in air traffic control for the Department of Civil Aviation in the 1970s.

He retired as Director of Safety and Environment in 1998, before moving to New Zealand and taking on the role of General Manager, Personnel Licensing and Aviation Services for the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority.

Rob returned to Australia to become Director of Safety Investigation for the Australian Transport Safety Bureau until he retired in 2004, and retains a major interest in safety management systems and regulatory issues.

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Standards Consultative Committee (SCC)

The SCC brings together representatives from a diverse range of aviation industry groups to work with CASA on regulatory change. With 35 organisations represented on the main committee and a combined total of 300 CASA and industry participants in the SCC and its nine sub-committees, the commitment, effort and coordination of the process represents a significant achievement.

The SCC's principal task is to consider safety regulatory issues in relation to the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations (1998) (CASRs), amendments to the Civil Aviation Regulations (1988) (CARs) and Civil Aviation Orders (CAOs), Manuals of Standards (MOS) and Advisory Circulars (ACs).

The SCC also considers legislative change proposals to recommend to CASA which proposals should be advanced and the priority attached to each proposal. Further, the SCC identifies individual industry experts to work with CASA staff on the development of regulatory proposals.

CASA wishes to acknowledge the value of consultation with the aviation industry in its regulatory development process through the Standards Consultative Committee and its Sub-Committees. Both CASA and the aviation industry have much to gain through the engagement of technically competent, well experienced and diversely qualified personnel. This enables CASA to deliver aviation safety regulations which are contemporary and practical, reflect industry best practice; and are capable of responding to industry future directions.

With 40 aviation industry organisations represented on the main committee and a combined total of over 300 CASA and aviation industry personnel involved in the SCC and its Sub-Committees - the commitment, effort and coordination of the consultative process represents a significant achievement. Each representative organisation on the SCC or individual represented on the Sub-Committees has the opportunity to:

  • Contribute information, ideas, experience and expertise;
  • Challenge and debate ideas and approaches;
  • Work towards agreed positions with the safety regulator;
  • Advance interests where appropriate and feasible;
  • Gain an understanding of the bigger picture; and
  • Network with peers to promote cross-sector understanding.

Through the regulatory development process, the common goal of both CASA and the aviation industry is to develop aviation rules and supporting material which enables a safe and efficient aviation system. This helps CASA to achieve its vision of 'Safe Skies for all' and to ensure the diverse yet significant needs of each industry sector are recognised and respected during the rule making process. Above all else, CASA's regulatory material must achieve 'safety through clarity'.

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SCC's objective

The objectives of the SCC is to:

  • consider regulatory proposals that have been submitted to the SCC by CASA with a view to deciding whether a proposal is worthy of consideration and, if so, recommend a level of priority that should be placed on the regulatory work associated with the proposal.
  • through the aviation industry members of the SCC, identify individual industry experts to work with CASA staff on the development of regulatory proposals which are accepted as elements of the Aviation Safety Standards development programme.

The SCC has additional roles such as:

'Information source'

The SCC is an aviation industry source of information to CASA. Through the SCC, the aviation industry informs CASA on activities which have an impact on industry and its safety outcomes. For example it informs CASA of the industry's activities and assists CASA's regulatory development through the 'Path to better aviation rules' consultation process.

General Issues 'Feedback forum'

The SCC serves as a forum for consultation over a broad range of issues relating to CASA's responsibilities. The SCC provides an avenue for industry to voice its perceptions, in a general sense, with Australia's civil aviation legislation, as well as generic issues associated with CASA's compliance, enforcement or regulatory services matters. The SCC provides recommendations to CASA on standards development and regulatory reform program implementation activities. The SCC makes recommendations to CASA that arise through SCC and Sub-Committee activities. The SCC also provides input to and endorses the work of special working groups that are established to achieve particular activities, such as work on CEO Directives. The SCC receives feedback from CASA on how it has managed those recommendations so that the decision making process is open, transparent and accountable.

'Co-ordinator and issues resolution forum'

The SCC provides the authority and reporting line for decisions arising from its Sub-Committees. The SCC establishes related processes and procedures for the Sub-Committees and provides an issues resolution forum for Conflicting industry views between Sub-Committees.

'New ideas testing forum'

The SCC provides a forum for CASA or the aviation industry to raise and exchange new ideas, test new initiatives and discuss future developments. This enables both CASA and industry to keep abreast of industry trends and issues and commence planning for standards development or regulatory implementation activities.

'CEO Directives'

At the request of the CASA CEO, the SCC is tasked from time to time with providing technical consideration of specific CEO Directives. The purpose of the CEO Directives is to assist the CASA CEO make strategic policy and management decisions by having specific issues examined for their appropriateness, completeness, clarity, and safety benefit.

'Guiding Principles'

Guiding Principles are the agreed principles or terms of reference for the establishment of each new CASR Part. The Guiding Principles set the policy intent, safety outcomes, stakeholders, major activities and implementation activities associated with that Part or, in future, with other regulatory development activities. The SCC reviews and advises on each new Guiding Principles document.

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Activities for 2004-05

The SCC met four times during 2004-05. Some of the key issues considered were the:

  • Guiding Principles for CASR Parts 115 and 119 Subpart M;
  • Appointment of aviation industry co-chairs for each Sub-Committee;
  • Development of an Options Paper regarding the SCC's Future Role;
  • Recommendation to CASA for a preferred parallel path for flight crew licensing;
  • Various legislative amendments to CASRs, CARs (1988) and CAOs;
  • Progression of activities to achieve CEO Directive 16/2004; and
  • Development of a cooperative consultation plan and 'fast-track' consultation process for minor legislative changes.

The SCC also provided pre-issue review of the following consultation documents:

  • Draft DP 0404OS - Fatigue Management - suggested alternatives to prescribed Flight and Duty Times
  • Draft DP 0412CS - Proposal to Automatically Mandate Compliance with Airworthiness Directives issued by a State of Design
  • Draft DP 0410AS - Carriage and Use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Avionics
  • Draft DP 0408CS - Concept of fitting tamper resistant time recording devices to helicopters
  • Draft NPC 65/01 - Proposed Amendments to Manual of Standards (MOS) Part 65 - Air Traffic Services Licensing and Training Requirements
  • Draft NPC 172/01 - Proposed amendments to the Manual of Standards (MOS) for Part 172 - Air Traffic Service Providers
  • Draft NPRM 0403OS - Disclosure of Personal Information
  • Draft NPRM 0407MS - Maintenance and Maintenance Personnel Requirements
  • Draft NPRM 0409OS - Air Transport Operations - Small Aeroplanes - CASR Part 135
  • Draft NPRM 0406AS - Aeronautical Telecommunication Service and Radionavigation Service Providers
  • Draft NPRM 0411MS - CASR Part 119M - Airworthiness and Maintenance Requirements
  • Draft NPRM 0502CS - Proposed AD for Replacement of control cables

Further Information

Further information about the SCC (including its membership, Sub-Committees, meetings and activities) is provided on CASA's web site at http://rrp.casa.gov.au/scc/

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Sub-Committee Reports

Airspace Users Group

The Airspace Users Group met once in 2004-05. Sub-Committee activities included:

  • Discussion on access for sport aviation aircraft to Class E airspace;
  • Consideration of draft Advisory Circular 139-09(0) - Aerodrome safety inspections at registered and certain other aerodromes;
  • Review of the draft Notice of Final Rule Making (NFRM) to Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) 0406AS - Aeronautical Telecommunication Service and Radionavigation Service Providers;
  • Review of draft Notice of Proposed Change NPC 172/01 - Proposed Amendments to Manual of Standards (MOS) Part 172 - Air Traffic Service Providers;
  • CASR Part 65 - Post Implementation Review
  • Consideration of CEO Directive 16/2004
  • Review of draft Discussion Paper DP 0410AS - Carriage and use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) Avionics - CASR Parts 71, 91, 101 and 103.

Certification Standards Sub-Committee

The Certification Standards Sub-Committee met on one occasion in 2004-05. Sub-Committee activities included:

  • Undertaking CEO Directive 16/2004 reviews for CASR Part 146 and 21.H
  • Airworthiness requirements for light sport aircraft.
  • Consideration of Airworthiness Directives issued by a State of Design.
  • The selection of an aviation industry Sub-Committee co-chair.

Flight Crew Licensing Standards Sub-Committee

The Flight Crew Licensing Standards Sub-Committee met on three occasions in 2004-05. Sub-Committee activities included:

  • CEO Directive 16/2004 reviews for CASR Parts 61 and 141.
  • Consideration of parallel path proposals for flight crew licensing.
  • The selection of an aviation industry Sub-Committee co-chair.

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Operational Standards Sub-Committee

The Operational Standards Sub-Committee met on two occasions in 2004-05. Sub-Committee activities included:

  • CEO Directive 16/2004 Working Group reviews for CASR Parts 91, 133 & 135.
  • Consideration of Airworthiness Directives issued by a State of Design.
  • Consideration of draft NPRM 0409OS - Air Transport Operations - Small Aeroplanes - CASR Part 135
  • The post-implementation review of CASR Part 101 - Unmanned aircraft and rocket operations.
  • Draft DP 0404OS - Fatigue Management - suggested alternatives to prescribed Flight and Duty Times.
  • The selection of an aviation industry Sub-Committee co-chair.

Maintenance Standards Sub-Committee

The Maintenance Standards Sub-Committee met on five occasions in 2004-05. Sub-Committee activities included:

  • CEO Directive 16/2004 reviews for CASR Parts 43, 66, 145, 147 and 183 and CASR Subparts M for 91, 121, 133A & 135.
  • The review of Guiding Principles for the maintenance regulations.
  • The review of proposed amendments to CASR Part 45 - Nationality and registration marks.
  • The selection of an aviation industry Sub-Committee co-chair.
  • Draft DP 0412CS - Proposal to Automatically Mandate Compliance with Airworthiness Directives issued by a State of Design
  • Draft DP 0408CS - Concept of fitting tamper resistant time recording devices to helicopters.
  • Draft NPRM 0411MS - CASR Part 119M - Airworthiness and Maintenance Requirements.
  • The selection of an aviation industry Sub-Committee co-chair.

Recreational Aviation Standards Sub-Committee

The Recreational Aviation Standards Sub-Committee met on four occasions in 2004-05. Sub-Committee activities included:

  • CEO Directive 16/2004 reviews for CASR Parts 103 & 105.
  • The consideration of Guiding Principles for CASR Parts 115 & 149.
  • The development of drafting instructions for CASR Part 149.
  • The selection of an aviation industry Sub-Committee co-chair.
  • Consideration of parallel path proposals for flight crew licensing.

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CASA Hotline

In 2004-05 there were 232 calls to the CASA Hotline, which was set up to give people straightforward and confidential access to CASA about aviation safety concerns. Many of these calls came from people working in the industry who wanted to bring to light troubling practices relating to flight and duty rostering, maintenance, reporting of incidents and defects, validity of licences and so on. Others came from members of the public who wished to raise concerns about low and dangerous flying, and to report incidents that occurred on flights upon which they were travelling. The Hotline is an extremely valuable source of safety intelligence for CASA and CASA makes every effort to ensure that all concerns raised are promptly addressed.

Corporate Communications

CASA is strongly committed to maintaining and improving effective communication with the aviation industry, the travelling public and its staff.

In the past year, relationships with the Australian and international media have been further improved, ensuring information on aviation safety is quickly and accurately delivered as required. During the reporting period, a total of nine hundred and fourty media stories about CASA were monitored. From these stories, negative comment about aviation safety and CASA itself in the Australian media was measured and shown to be continuously low - averaging just under four per cent of all media analysed.

CASA continues to respond in a timely fashion to requests from people in the aviation industry for information. A dedicated email address for enquiries receives dozens of requests each week and responses are prepared daily.

Communication with staff remains one of CASA's highest priorities, and during the reporting period, a review of CASA's internal communications strategy was completed to ensure that our communication strategies meet the needs of CASA and its staff.

During the year, the Chief Executive Officer made a series of visits to CASA's Area and Airline Office network. These visits gave staff the opportunity to meet him and to discuss their work, aviation issues, ideas and concerns and also provide ongoing feedback to the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Operating Officer on the 'Building a New CASA' series of reforms. These visits will continue in 2005-06.

In addition, the Chief Executive Officer and key members of the CASA Senior Management Group attended a series of Industry Consultation Forums. During the reporting period, these Forums were held in Cairns, Townsville, Perth, Darwin, Adelaide and Bankstown. These forums will continue in 2005-06.

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A meeting held in Adelaide during the reporting period recently gave CASA representatives the opportunity to liaise with local industry members, and opened the floor for those members to raise their concerns and questions.

Bill Riceman, Central Area manager, reported that around 25 industry people attended the meeting, reflecting the diversity of the aviation industry in the region.

"They included the chief executive Officer of BAE Systems Flight Training (Australia), which is the largest flying school in the country and the general manager of Tenix Aviation, which is a large maintenance organisation," Bill says.

"We also had present a representative from National Air Support at one end of the scale, and CEOs and general managers from small charter operators and maintenance organisations at the other end."

CASA's Chief Operating Officer Bruce Gemmell opened the meeting and was followed by Bill who outlined the function of the local Compliance division area Office and introduced the staff.

Jim Marcolin, acting general manager, General Aviation Operations, spoke about the management system model and the responsibility that company managers have in ensuring safety of their operations.

There were also presentations from Reg Perkins, acting general manager, Regulatory Services, on the work of the Regulatory Services branch and Regulatory Reform Program implementation, and Nicola Hinder, acting executive manager, Corporate Affairs, who discussed CASA's complaints and compliments handling process.

"There were opportunities for questions throughout, and a panel discussion to answer questions from the floor on any topic raised. Acting executive manager, Compliance, Arthur White, ended the meeting with closing remarks," says Bill.

"Overall the feedback from the people who attended was good. They appreciated the opportunity to hear from, and to speak directly to senior CASA staff, as well as to meet some of the local CASA staff in a social context in the area Office."

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International relations

Australia is a signatory to the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the Chicago Convention), which provides for the safe and orderly development of international civil aviation.

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), which was established by the Convention, develops international Standards and Recommended Practices using international panels and working groups. These Standards and Recommended Practices are published in eighteen annexes to the Convention.

The Transport and Regional Services portfolio has carriage of Australia's participation in ICAO, with the various agencies taking responsibility for ICAO activities falling within their legislative functions. CASA is responsible for seven of the eighteen annexes, and shares responsibility for a further two annexes with Airservices Australia.

In 2004-05 CASA continued to provide strong support to ICAO, although resource constraints continue to require a detailed prioritisation of that support to ensure maximum benefit from reduced funds. In recognition of these constraints, CASA conducted a review of its International Relations strategies, and consideration is currently being given to the outcome of this review with a view to making recommendations for implementation early in 2005-2006.

See Appendix 3 for information about significant contributions made to ICAO's work during the year.

Bilateral arrangements

CASA continues to work towards bilateral arrangements with various partner States. Notably, during 2004-05, the former Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Transport and Regional Services, the Hon John Anderson MP signed the Executive Agreement to a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) with the United States of America.

Mr David Fetter, Mr William Stanton and Hon John Anderson MP

Mr David Fetter, First Secretary (Economics), United States Embassy, Mr William Stanton, Charges d'Affaire Ad-Interim, United States Embassy and the Hon John Anderson MP, Former Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Transport and Regional Services

In addition to the work undertaken to complete the Executive Agreement to the Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement, significant work was undertaken by CASA, the Department of Transport and Regional Services, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Attorney General's Department on the Implementation Procedures for Airworthiness (IPA) which accompany the BASA. The IPA is the first treaty-level procedure negotiated under the BASA and sets out the detailed technical processes which the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will undertake in certifying, approving and overseeing a range of activities covering airworthiness, including design approvals, production activities, export airworthiness approvals and technical assistance between authorities.

This set of procedures will benefit and promote Australia's aviation exports to the United States, because Australian manufacturers' products will be Certified and approved by CASA and recognised by the FAA. This is a significant portfolio and Australian achievement. It is expected that the IPA will be signed by the Minister for Transport and Regional Services, The Hon Warren Truss MP early in the 2005-2006 reporting period.

CASA continues to work with the United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority on an agreement relating to aircraft below 450 kgs. The assumption of Certification responsibility for other aircraft by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has negated the value of future individual national agreements and therefore CASA has commenced discussions with EASA with the intention of negotiating an agreement that will cover all EASA countries. This matter will be progressed by CASA, and its portfolio partners during 2005-06.

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Trans-Tasman relations

As part of a larger government direction, CASA continues to work closely with the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority to put in place technical procedures and systems that will allow respective airlines to operate domestically in either country with the minimum of additional Certification. Such procedures will maintain the high standards of aviation safety required of airlines by the relevant safety regulator.

This process is complemented by the work undertaken by the Australian Department of Transport and Regional Services and the New Zealand Ministry of Transport to provide a policy framework appropriate for these operations.

Regional activities

Throughout the year, CASA remained active in the Pacific region with the provision of substantial support to assist in the establishment of the Pacific Aviation Safety Office (PASO).

Following discussions with the Department of Transport and Regional Services (DOTARS), it was agreed that DOTARS would provide Australian representation on the PASO Council of Directors as of August 2005. CASA will provide advice and assistance to the Australian Representative in relation to the aviation safety technical issues which PASO is likely to face as it becomes operational.

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