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CASA Annual Report 2003 04 Part 2: Operational Report

Operational Report

Effectiveness in 2003–04

Enhanced level of safety in the aviation industry

Accident rates – regular public transport

Over the decade, the total accident rate averaged 0.2 per 100 000 hours flown for the high-capacity sector and 1.1 for the low-capacity sector.

Figure 4: Regular public transport: total accident rate, 1994–2003 (total accidents per 100 000 hours flown)

Figure 4: Regular public transport: total accident rate, 1994-2003

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau. Note: Data for 2003 are preliminary.

Over the decade there have been no fatal accidents in high-capacity regular public transport. The fatal accident rate for the low-capacity sector is shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5: Regular public transport: fatal accident rate, 1994–2003 (fatal accidents per 100 000 hours flown)

Figure 5: Regular public transport: fatal accident rate, 1994-2003

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau. Note: Data for 2003 are preliminary.

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Accident rates – general aviation

Over the decade, the total number of general aviation accidents per 100 000 hours flown is estimated to have decreased at a steady rate of 4.4 per cent per year.

Figure 6: General aviation: total accident rate, 1994–2003 (total accidents per 100 000 hours flown)

Figure 6: General aviation: total accident rate, 1994-2003

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau Notes: Data for 2003 are preliminary. Excludes accidents for sports aviation.

Over the decade, the number of fatal accidents per 100 000 hours flown in the General Aviation sector is estimated to have declined by 5.7 per cent each year.

Figure 7: General aviation: fatal accident rate, 1994–2003 (fatal accidents per 100 000 hours flown)

Figure 7: General aviation: fatal accident rate, 1994-2003

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau Notes: Data for 2003 are preliminary. Excludes accidents for sports aviation.

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Fatalities

Over the decade there have been no fatalities in high-capacity regular public transport. Figure 8 shows the fatality rate for the low-capacity sector.

Figure 8: Regular public transport: fatalities 1994–2003 (fatalities per 100 000 hours flown)

Figure 8: Regular public transport: fatalities 1994-2003

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau. Note: Data for 2003 are preliminary.

Over the decade, the number of fatalities per 100 000 hours flown in the General Aviation sector is estimated to have declined by 3.7 per cent each year.

Figure 9: General aviation: fatalities, 1994–2003 (fatalities per 100 000 hours flown)

Figure 9: General aviation: fatalities, 1994-2003

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau. Notes: Data for 2003 are preliminary. Excludes accidents for sports aviation.

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Incident rates – breakdowns of separation

Over the past five years, the total number of breakdowns of separation peaked in the March quarter of 2001 and has declined since then.

Figure 10: Breakdowns of separation, 3rd quarter 1999 to 1st quarter 2004

Figure 10: Breakdowns of separation, 3rd quarter 1999 to 1st quarter 2004

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau

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Focused utilisation of safety resources
Efficiency
  • made regulatory service processing changes that freed specialist staff to concentrate on more complex and safety-significant tasks
  • adopted a policy of basing safety rules squarely on known risks
  • undertook a comprehensive safety-risk review of the general operating and flight rules contained in Part 91 of the proposed new civil aviation safety regulations
  • developed an award-winning quantitative risk model to assess, compare and predict safety risks
  • started a broad air safety review to identify major safety risks in each aviation sector by examining accident data.
  • used the findings of the first phase of the safety review to identify flying instruction initiatives to reduce pilot errors in flight planning, aircraft handling and fuel management
  • instituted a new policy of risk-based surveillance from an industry-wide perspective
  • invited the aerial agriculture industry to consider moving to self-administration
  • reduced processing time for subsequent issue with no change and non-complex variation applications handled by the Service Centre, down to an average of seven days.
  • reduced average processing time by up to 34 per cent for initial issue applications and applications for more complex variations
  • processed 92 per cent of Certificate of Approval (COA) applications and 89 per cent of Air Operator’s Certificates (AOC) applications on time
  • provided simpler, more trouble-free access to regulatory services by streamlining procedures, simplifying forms and giving applicants better guidance
  • upgraded the Workflow Management System, which supports regulatory service delivery, for better usability, reliability and efficiency
  • accomplished 75 per cent of the year’s planned deliverables for the CASA Improvement Program
  • developed a proposal for a cheaper, quicker approach to retiring CASA’s Licensing, Aircraft Registrations and Publications system
  • improved professional capability with a training effort that exceeded both CASA’s own target and the public service benchmark.

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Clear, concise and unambiguous national safety standards, internationally harmonised as appropriate
Standards
  • six CASR Parts were made, bringing the total to 30 out of a planned 58 for the whole Regulatory Reform Program
  • substantial progress was made in developing regulatory packages for the remaining CASR Parts, but quality objectives for reform have been given precedence over completing the program quickly
  • industry completed the transition to new regulations relating to new production rules and the consignment and carriage of dangerous goods
  • implementation of four other CASR Parts is underway and progressing well
  • necessary changes were instituted to support implementation of the National Airspace System.
Compliance with Australian aviation safety legislation
Compliance
Enhanced perception of CASA’s effectiveness as an aviation safety regulator and educator
Community
  • 86 per cent satisfaction from respondents to a survey about regulatory services through the CASA Service Centre
  • 98 per cent of external complaints were dealt with within the timeframe laid down in the CASA Service Charter and a new complaints and compliments handling process under executive oversight was put in place
  • overall attendance at CASA safety seminars was 5446, down by 14.8 per cent
  • approximately 16 per cent of stories in the media portrayed CASA as positively promoting or maintaining aviation safety compared with 4 per cent of total stories critical of CASA. 80 per cent of total media stories were neutral.

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Grants for Engineering Apprentices

The aviation industry needs a new generation moving into aircraft maintenance engineering. This year CASA started a scholarship program to encourage young people to take up engineering as a profession, particularly in regional areas.

In February 2004, CASA awarded six special two-year scholarships and two encouragement awards to outstanding engineering apprentices. Six of the successful apprentices grew up in regional Australia, with two continuing to work in regional aviation centres.

The two-year scholarships provide a cash grant of $1000 a year, while the encouragement awards are a one-off $1000 payment to cover study costs this year. The grants are to help the apprentices with essential expenses such as professional quality tools, text books, travel and accommodation.

The two-year scholarships were awarded to:

  • Daniel Guilfoyle – Elite Helicopters at Essendon
  • Jordan Beecroft – Brindabella Airlines at Canberra
  • Ian Watson – Aero-Support at Bankstown
  • Kristie McKinnon – Qantas at Sydney
  • Jamie Dull – Approved Aircraft Maintenance at Toowoomba
  • Rowan Strutt – Helicopter Resources at Hobart

Encouragement awards went to:

  • Barrie McKinney – Eastern Australia Airlines at Tamworth
  • Matthew Evans – Premiair at Jandakot

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