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CASA Annual Report 2002 03 Part 4: Corporate governance

Part 4: Operational performance report

Output group 3: Aviation safety promotion

Description

CASA has regulatory responsibility to encourage greater acceptance, by the aviation industry, of its obligation to maintain high standards of aviation safety, through:

  • comprehensive safety education and training programs
  • accurate and timely aviation safety advice
  • fostering an awareness in industry management, and within the community generally, of the importance of aviation safety and compliance with relevant legislation.

Planned output

An informed and safety motivated aviation community is achieved.

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Context for 2002–03

  • The need to focus safety promotion activities on identified safety deficiencies and opportunities. In 2002–03, we identified unauthorised entry into controlled airspace, controlled flight into terrain, and safety management system implementation as high safety priorities.
  • The need to increase the prominence of safety education campaigns by working with large operators, manufacturers, industry associations, insurers and other agencies.
  • The need to extend safety promotion coverage by encouraging aviation training groups to provide a broader range of courses and helping them improve their teaching and learning techniques.
  • The need to research human factors in aviation safety and promote awareness in the aviation community.

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Highlights of performance

Highlights of CASA's performance during 2002–03 include:

  • higher level of awareness of safety management systems
  • 75 per cent of surveyed participants more confident as a result of safety management system seminars
  • over 90 per cent of Flight Safety Australia readers rate it as 'very useful' or 'extremely useful'
  • higher demand for CASA safety education products.

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Performance report

Performance measure Target Result

Achieve planned level of coverage throughout industry segments.

100%

100%

CASA conducted a total of 44 safety promotion seminars and conferences as planned, though the pattern of activities was somewhat altered. In particular, financial constraints prevented us holding as many roadshows and regional seminars as we had intended.

Educating operators about safety management systems was our major focus. A notable development was the introduction of flying instructor seminars as part of our strategy to train the trainers in industry.

In addition to our formal education and training program, we put a significant effort into aviation safety awareness through our involvement in the biennial Australian International Airshow, held at Avalon in February.

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Table 13: Number of safety seminars and conferences

Activity Target Result

Flight Safety Forums

8

8

Roadshows/Regionals

15

9

Safety Management Systems education1

20

22

Flight Operations Conference

0

1

Maintenance Seminar

1

0

Instructor Seminars

0

4

Total

44

44

1. Includes seminars in support of industry conferences and AOC entry control

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Performance measure Target Result

Participation in safety promotion safety seminars.

N/a

6390

Industry continued to participate keenly in CASA's safety promotion activities. There was strong interest in safety management systems programs, with a range of activities attracting close to 1300 people.

The Roadshow programs were very well attended with total participation over 30% higher than last year, despite a smaller number of programs. Participation in our Flight Safety Forums fell.

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Table 14: Attendance at safety seminars and conferences

Activity Attendance

Flight Safety Forums

2030

Roadshows / Regionals

2641

Safety Management Systems education2

1291

Flight Operations Conference

300

Instructor Seminars

127

Total

6390

2. Includes seminars in support of industry conferences and AOC entry control

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Performance measure Target Result

Level of satisfaction with content and delivery of seminars/campaigns.

90%

High

There was no systematic collection of quantitative data in 2002–03. There is evidence of a high level of industry satisfaction based on indications such as positive verbal and written commentary from participants, and strong demand for return visits.

CASA will be establishing a new attendee survey in 2003–04 to gain quantifiable feedback, identify outcomes and inform program development.

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Performance measure Target Result

Percentage of aviation businesses that are early adopters of safety management systems.

30%

Not measured

CASA decided it was too early this year to look at how many operators have adopted safety management systems and we continued to focus our efforts on awareness raising and education. We will conduct a survey in 2003–04 to measure the rate of industry adoption of safety management systems.

There is evidence that the present level of industry interest in the safety management systems is high. During 2002–03:

  • a series of safety management system seminars around the country attracted some 650 participants
  • demand for CASA's safety management information pack exceeded expectations, with an additional 2000 packs produced during the year to meet requests
  • there were 7618 page views on the safety management system reference page on the CASA web site and three safety management system booklets were downloaded over 1200 times
  • we have received in the order of 30 requests from large and small operators for help implementing integrated safety management systems.

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Performance measure Target Result

Number of accidents per hours flown.

Declining trend

Declining trend

Over the decade, there has been a consistent reduction in total accidents of 5.6% each year and a comparable reduction of 5.8% per year in the fatal accident rate.

Note: The graph provides actual and modelled data. The squares represent the actual number of fatalities for a particular year. The solid line can be thought of as an average of these figures over the entire period. It clarifies the main trend in the data and provides information about what might be expected in the future if the trend continues. Data for 2002 are preliminary. Excludes sport aviation.

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau

Figure 14: Accident rates per 100,000 flying hours

Figure 14: Accident rates per 100,000 flying hours

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Performance measure Target Result

Number of fatalities per hours flown.

Declining trend

Declining trend

Over the decade to 2002, the data indicate an annual reduction in fatalities of just under 6.0% each year.

Note: The graph provides actual and modelled data. The squares represent the actual number of fatalities for a particular year. The solid line can be thought of as an average of these figures over the entire period. It clarifies the main trend in the data and provides information about what might be expected in the future if the trend continues. Data for 2002 are preliminary. Excludes sport aviation.

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau

Figure 15: Fatalities per 100,000 flying hours

Figure 15: Fatalities per 100,000 flying hours

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Performance measure Target Result

Number of incidents by type per hours flown

Declining trend

Declining trend

CASA is monitoring violations of controlled airspace and breakdowns of separation against this measure.

Violations of controlled airspace

Over the past five years, the number of reported violations of controlled airspace peaked in the 1st quarter of 2001 at an estimated level of 278 per quarter.

Figure 16: Number of violations of controlled airspace

Figure 16: Number of violations of controlled airspace

Note: The graph provides actual and modelled data. The squares represent the actual number of violations of controlled airspace for a particular quarter. The solid curved line can be thought of as an average of these figures over the entire period. It clarifies the main trend in the data and provides information about what might be expected in the future if the trend continues.

Breakdowns of separation

The number of breakdowns of separation over the last five years is given in Figure 17. The data suggests that the number of breakdowns of separation peaked at over 41 events per quarter in the 2nd quarter of 2000 and has declined since.

Figure 17: Number of breakdown of separation events

Figure 17: Number of breakdown of separation events

Note: The graph provides actual and modelled data. The squares represent the actual number of breakdowns of separation for a particular quarter. The solid curved line can be thought of as an average of these figures over the entire period. It clarifies the main trend in the data and provides information about what might be expected in the future if the trend continues.

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Performance measure Target Result

Number of unauthorised entries into (violations of) controlled airspace.

Declining trend

Declining trend

Unauthorised entries into (violations of) controlled airspace are one of the types of incidents CASA is monitoring (see Figure 16 above). We have identified these incidents as a priority area to be addressed through safety promotion and in 2003 we introduced an education program. It is too early to evaluate the impact of this program.

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Performance measure Target Result

Training groups consulted.

Course material meets needs

Not required by training organisations

During the year we made formal approaches to major training organisations to identify areas where CASA can work with them proactively, but the response was limited. We found that there has been a decline in the number of aviation-related tertiary programs although some growth was indicated in the integrated professional pilot programs based at major flying schools. Flying schools contacted are very enthusiastic about using CASA-developed instructor packs to deliver CASA programs.

Some safety management systems consultation has been undertaken with universities at their request. Many are incorporating these concepts into their tertiary education programs.

Performance measure Target Result

Training issues identified for possible inclusion in courses.

N/a

5

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Initiatives, developments and issues in 2002–03

Safety management systems

CASA's major safety promotion focus was again on developing industry understanding and adoption of integrated safety management.

A key component of the campaign was a series of seminars in all mainland capital cities. At these events, representatives of aviation companies described their experiences of implementing safety management and the benefits to both safety and business profitability. About 650 people attended around the country, and there was strong support expressed for the program and resource materials provided.

Two more educational booklets were published. These booklets were: SMS – What's in it for you? which outlines the business benefits of integrated safety management and Your safety management system - Is it working?, which describes approaches to evaluating the system and the data collected.

The complete education package now consists of two video tapes, a CD and three booklets. There is also a comprehensive reference source on the CASA Internet site.

Representatives from aviation companies

Representatives from aviation companies involved in safety management seminars. L-R Keith McKenzie (Sunstate Airlines), Kim Jones (CASA), Graham Edkins (formerly Qantas), Major John McGhee (Australian Army Aviation Corps), Dr. Rob Lee (consultant), Phil Cocker (Skywest), Trevor Wright (Wrights air), James Hunt (BAE Training Systems), Doug Stott (formerly Southern Airlines).

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Identified and emerging deficiencies

CASA has a rolling plan of action to address current and emerging safety issues and opportunities. In 2002–03 we:

  • developed a new education program for pilots on avoiding violations of controlled airspace, which we delivered in our Flight Safety Forums and made available to flying schools to help them address the problem with their students
  • responded to incidents with hand swinging propellers and refuelling by producing new video educational material for pilots
  • helped Airservices Australia with education programs at aerodromes subject to General Aviation Aerodrome Procedures
  • developed a new presentation to address pilot-performed maintenance in anticipation of implementation of proposed new maintenance regulations requiring pilots to demonstrate competency before carrying out certain maintenance tasks
  • co-operated with the Aviation Safety Foundation of Australia in their delivery of Controlled Flight Into Terrain education.

Other educational products we developed for the industry during the year were:

  • three new videos: 'Safety on the ground', 'Remote Aerodromes', and 'Safety Management Systems'
  • a new Visual Pilot Guide for Jandakot Airport
  • updates of the Melbourne and Sydney Visual Pilot Guides.

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Human factors

CASA is a centre of expertise in human factors issues. During 2002–03 our specialists continued to experience a growth in internal and external demand for their expertise. Activities included:

  • conducting an array of training courses for CASA surveillance and standards development staff
  • helping surveillance staff conduct airline audits
  • advising on preparation of new regulations incorporating requirements for consideration of human factors
  • advising on human factors issues in connection with CASA's acceptance of new large aircraft
  • participating in a ground-breaking research project examining fatigue management practices in conjunction with Qantas and the University of South Australia.

National Airspace System

In our industry education programs, we have provided opportunity for the National Airspace System (NAS) Implementation Group to brief pilots around the country on the NAS proposal and implementation.

We also produced printed and distributed pilot information and education material, including an education video. In 2003 we have allocated staff members to work exclusively, or for a high proportion of their time, under NAS direction, to produce pilot and marketing material.

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Where to from here

We will be continuing our push to achieve real safety gains by encouraging the industry to comply with regulatory requirements for safety's sake, not for fear of enforcement. Safety promotion is a key element of our move towards the 'safety maturity' model.

During 2003–04 our major focus will be on promoting a high level of understanding of the concept of integration of management systems for safety, risk and human factors issues.

Safety promotion communications

Flight Safety Australia, distributed to 85,000 people and organisations in the aviation community, has become one of the world's leading aviation safety magazines.

The editors regularly receive international requests to reproduce articles. Material from the magazine has appeared in leading aviation magazines in Europe, the United Kingdom, the USA, Canada, South-east Asia, the Middle East and elsewhere.

Surveys consistently find the magazine rated by over 90 per cent of its audience as either 'very useful' or 'extremely useful'.

Flight Safety Australia, now in its 37th edition, is produced bi-monthly by the Communications Section of Aviation Safety Promotion. The six-person section employs experienced science and technology journalists and researchers, a multi-media producer and graphic artists.

The team provides production support for safety promotion seminars and workshops, and also produces safety promotion videos, guidebooks, posters, a website and multi-media products. The website builds on the success of the magazine, providing a searchable database of all feature articles dating back to its inception in 1995.

One of the highlights for the past year was the editing and production of a promotional pack on safety management systems, which includes a video, a CD and a series of well-received, practical guidebooks. Demand for the safety management pack exceeded expectations, with an additional 2000 packs produced during the year to meet requests.

The quality of the safety materials the section produces is reflected in growing industry demand for CASA safety promotion products. Distribution of safety promotional materials is free to identified target audiences, with a nominal charge to others to meet postage and handling.

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Some 450,000 products were shipped free of charge to target sectors of the aviation industry during the year, including Flight Safety Australia, videos, posters and guidebooks. Industry requests for specific safety promotion products, other than initial free distributions, have risen from 130 items per month in June 2002 to over 430 per month in April 2003.

The growing suite of safety promotional material now includes:

  • Visual pilot guides for Sydney Basin, Archerfield, Melbourne and Jandakot
  • CD ROMs on safety management, Setting your own standards, Weatherwise and In-flight decision making.
  • Posters on defect reporting, Watch out for wires and dangerous goods.
  • The VFR (Visual Flight Rules) Flight Guide
  • A series of eight maintenance booklets
  • Safety management systems pack
  • Setting your own standards pack
  • Career guides for chief pilots, pilots and licenced aircraft maintenance engineers.
  • Videos on navigation, safety management, hypoxia, ground safety, GPS non-precision approaches and remote aerodromes.

The team continues to strive for best practice by investing in skills development, technology support for production, target audience research, and close liaison with technical specialists within CASA and the aviation industry.

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