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CASA Annual Report 2002 03 Part 1: Overview of CASA

Part 1: Overview of CASA

Performance scorecard for 2002–03

This scorecard provides a report against key corporate performance measures used by the CASA Board to monitor progress against the milestones set for the year. These measures are presented under the perspectives of safety, effectiveness and efficiency, community, and staff. The scorecard report provides trend data where available against these measures.

CASA's report against the full set of performance measures contained in our Portfolio Budget Statement for 2002–03 and Corporate Plan for 2002–03 to 2004–05 is provided in Part 4 and Part 5 of this report.

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Safety

Measure Score  

Number of accidents per hours flown.

Over the decade to 2002, there has been a consistent reduction in total accidents of 5.6 per cent each year and a comparable reduction of 5.8 per cent per year in the fatal accident rate.

Figure 2: Accident rates per 100,000 flying hours

Figure 2: Accident rates per 100,000 flying hours

Note: The graph provides actual and modelled data. The squares represent the actual number of fatalities for a particular year. The solid line can be thought of as an average of these figures over the entire period. It clarifies the main trend in the data and provides information about what might be expected in the future if the trend continues. Data for 2002 are preliminary. Excludes sport aviation.

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau.

Number of fatalities per hours flown.

Over the decade to 2002, the data indicate an annual reduction in fatalities of just under 6.0 per cent each year.

Figure 3: Fatalities per 100,000 flying hours

Figure 3: Fatalities per 100,000 flying hours

Note: The graph provides actual and modelled data. The squares represent the actual number of fatalities for a particular year. The solid line can be thought of as an average of these figures over the entire period. It clarifies the main trend in the data and provides information about what might be expected in the future if the trend continues. Data for 2002 are preliminary. Excludes sport aviation.

Source: Australian Transport Safety Bureau.

Number of incidents by type per hours flown:

CASA is monitoring violations of controlled airspace and breakdowns of separation against this measure.

Violations of controlled airspace.

Over the past five years, the total number of reported violations of controlled airspace peaked in the 1st quarter of 2001 at an estimated level of 278 per quarter.

Figure 4: Number of violations of controlled airspace

Figure 4: Number of violations of controlled airspace

Note: The graph provides actual and modelled data. The squares represent the actual number of violations of controlled airspace for a particular quarter. The solid curved line can be thought of as an average of these figures over the entire period. It clarifies the main trend in the data and provides information about what might be expected in the future if the trend continues.

Breakdowns of separation.

The number of breakdowns of separation over the last five years is given in Figure 5. The data suggests that the number breakdowns of separation peaked at over 41 events per quarter in the 2nd quarter of 2000 and has declined since then.

Figure 5: Number of breakdowns of separation events

Figure 5: Number of breakdowns of separation events

Note: The graph provides actual and modelled data. The squares represent the actual number of breakdowns of separation for a particular quarter. The solid curved line can be thought of as an average of these figures over the entire period. It clarifies the main trend in the data and provides information about what might be expected in the future if the trend continues.

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Percentage of aviation businesses that are early adopters of safety management systems.

We will conduct a survey in 2003–04 to measure the rate of industry adoption of safety management systems.

There is evidence that the present level of industry interest in safety management systems is high. During 2002–03:

Target: 30%

  • a series of safety management system seminars around the country attracted some 650 participants
  • demand for CASA's safety management information pack exceeded expectations, with an additional 2000 packs produced during the year to meet requests
  • there were 7618 page views on the safety management system reference page on the CASA web site and three safety management system booklets were downloaded over 1200 times.

See the report on Output Group 3 in Part 4 for more information.

Plan for Regulatory Reform Program Implementation against targets.

We estimate that we have completed 98 per cent of what we set out to do in 2002–03, including:

  • establishing a Program Management Group
  • developing plans and strategies
  • identifying the resources needed for the implementation task.

See Output Group 1 in Part 4 for more information.

Percentage of audits achieved against the audit plan by operating sector.

In 2002–03 CASA completed a total of 1141 audits. This was 99% of the total number of audits planned, continuing the good result of the previous year.

See the report on Output Group 2 in Part 4 for further information.

Target: 100%

Figure 6: Percentage of scheduled audits completed, 2000–01 to 2002–03

Figure 6: Percentage of scheduled audits completed, 2000–01 to 2002–03

Table1: Number of scheduled audits completed, 2000–01 to 2002–03

Sector 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03

General aviation

259

587

714

Domestic airlines

87

84

103

International airlines

86

80

97

Aerodromes

214

229

215

Other

29

34

12

Total

675

1014

1141

Special audits are based on safety intelligenceand are planned and carried out from time to time.

No target is set for this measure.

CASA completed a total of 307 special audits in 2002–03. The number of audits conducted in each operating sector over the past three years is set out in Table 2.

Table 2: Number of special audits, 2000–01 to 2002–03

Sector 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03

General aviation

458

428

279

Airlines

17

76

18

Aerodromes

-

17

10

The number of special audits conducted in general aviation has decreased in line with the increased number of scheduled audits and has also been affected by calls on available resources for other priority activities.

The introduction of the International Cell in Airline Operations in 2001–02 saw a dramatic increase in the number of special audits conducted in that sector. This figure decreased in 2002–03 when international audits were included in scheduled audits.

Percentage of general aviation desktop audits achieved against the audit plan.

Target: 100%

We have achieved 99% of the audit plan in each of the two years since this form of auditing was introduced.

There was a slight drop in the number of audits conducted from 2973 in 2001–02 to 2863 this year.

Note: CASA plans six monthly desktop audits for each operator. Changes in the number planned reflect changes in the number of operators.

Average number of days overdue on clearance of requests for corrective action.

Available data indicates that CASA is continuing to reduce the number of days overdue on clearance of Requests for Corrective Action (RCA) and has achieved an average well under the target. CASA is reviewing the procedures for closure of RCAs to ensure that it is an effective measure of industry response times and CASA's determination to follow-up and close RCAs.

CASA's new Surveillance Procedures Manual will introduce a requirement that operators submit a satisfactory response to an RCA within 28 days. We will also institute a number of other changes to improve the effectiveness of RCAs as a safety tool (see the report on Output Group 2 in Part 4 for further information).

Number of low-capacity regular public transport (LCRPT) operators visited to introduce safety management practices and current surveillance processes against project plan.

Target: 95%

This initiative began in mid-2002 and visits were planned to occur over a two-year period. By the end of 2002–03, we had completed 81% of the total number of visits planned.

The visits program has applied only to low capacity regular public transport operators managed by CASA's Area Offices, as those managed by our Airline Offices have already been introduced to safety management practices and systems surveillance. The initiative was established when CASA surveillance practices were being revised and developed. As well as an added opportunity for industry education, the initiative has provided valuable experience that CASA is using to bed down effective surveillance procedures.

We are reviewing the need for the initiative now that safety management systems training is available to both staff and industry as part of our safety promotion program and operator case management is coming on stream through the Regulatory Reform Program Implementation.

The new Surveillance Procedures Manual will provide detailed information on systems auditing methods that operators will be able to access through the Internet. An educative video, to be released early in 2003–04, will provide additional guidance.

Number of low-capacity regular public transport operators audited using system safety audit techniques.

Target: 90%

CASA more than met the target for planned audits in 2002–03.

All low-capacity regular public transport operators were audited using system safety audit techniques. These audits have now been subsumed into normal, everyday surveillance activity following an initial linkage with the above education visits initiative.

A Surveillance Review Team has been established. The lessons learned from the LCRPT initiative and the writing of the Surveillance Procedures Manual will be part of the ongoing review for continuous improvement of our surveillance practices and procedures.

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Effectiveness and efficiency

Measure Score  

Number of Air Operator's Certificates (AOCs) and Certificates of Approval (COAs) issued within timeframes agreed with individual applicants.

Target: 85%

The percentage of AOCs issued within the timeframes agreed with individual applicants was slightly below target due to pressure on resources from further growth of 9% in the volume of applications.

The percentage of COAs issued within the timeframes agreed with individual applicants rose to 75% this year compared with 65% in 2001–02. This was despite an increase of 8% in the number of applications.

100% of subsequent issues of AOCs and COAs were on time.

See Output Group 4 in Part 4 for more information.

Figure 7: On-time issue of certificates within agreed timeframes

Figure 7: On-time issue of certificates within agreed timeframes

Note: This measure applies to certificates for the general aviation sector issued through the National Service Centre.

Average processing time by category for Air Operator's Certificates and Certificates of Approval.

CASA achieved significant improvements in processing times in 2002–03, despite increases of 9% and 8% respectively in the numbers of AOC and COA applications received. See Output Group 4 in Part 4 for more information.

Table 3: Improved processing times for AOCs and COAs

Category AOCs COAs
 

Average number of days

% reduction on 2001–02

Average number of days

% reduction on 2001–02

Initial issue

97

18

61

16

Variations

37

14

36

18

Note: This measure applies to certificates for the general aviation sector issued through the National Service Centre.

Number of processes for entry to the aviation industry reviewed or simplified.

Target: 10

CASA met the 2002–03 target of simplifying 10 processes.

See Output Group 4 in Part 4 for more information.

Performance of CASA Improvement Program against outcomes, budgets and schedules.

The alliance team (comprising CASA and Accenture Holdings Pty Limited) was assessed as meeting expected performance on all projects undertaken in 2002–03 (based on a series of fee-linked key performance indicators). See the report on systems and processes in Part 5 for more information.

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Community

Measure Score

Public satisfaction with aviation safety.

CASA conducts biennial surveys to monitor the views of the public about aviation safety. The most recent survey, undertaken in May 2002, found the majority of people are confident about the safety of air travel in Australia and over 80 per cent think it is as safe as or safer than flying in countries such as the United States or Canada.

The next survey will take place in late 2003 or early 2004.

Industry satisfaction with aviation safety.

No survey was done in 2002–03. The most recent survey, conducted in August 2001, found that a majority considered the standard of air safety in Australia to be very good.

A new survey will be designed and administered during 2003–04.

External complaints satisfactorily finalised within the timeframe set in the CASA Service Charter.

Target: 100%

CASA's performance improved by 4% in 2002–03 to an annual average of 90%. Resource constraints early in the year prevented us reaching the target.

Note: This measure applies to complaints relating to services provided through the National Service Centre.

Level of satisfaction of Minister's staff and other Government agencies with responsiveness of CASA to requests for information.

Target 90%

This was not systematically measured in 2002–03. However, feedback from the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Transport and Regional Services and from the Department of Transport and Regional Services indicates that CASA is well regarded.

Early in 2003–04 CASA began dealing direct with the Minister's office on the bulk of our ministerial correspondence and briefings. This will make statistical analysis possible for our next annual report.

See also, 'Stakeholder relationships' in Part 5.

Participation in safety promotion seminars.

In 2002–03 some 6,400 people from the aviation industry participated in CASA's safety promotion seminars, almost double the number who were attending such activities two years ago.

Much of the difference in overall participation between this year and last is attributable to there having been two large regulatory reform conferences on maintenance in 2001–02.

See the report on Output Group 3 in Part 4 for further information.

Figure 8: Attendance at safety promotion seminars

Figure 8: Attendance at safety promotion seminars

Industry satisfaction with provision of regulatory services for issue of Air Operator's Certificates and Certificates of Approval.

Target: 85%

We are working on mechanisms for collecting, analysing and reporting data that will provide a clear view of industry satisfaction and highlight where service improvements are required.

Meanwhile, with complaints about service running at 2% of the applications received, the level of satisfaction is assessed as high.

Note: This measure relates to services provided through the National Service Centre.

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Staff satisfaction.

An employee survey conducted in October 2002 revealed that 58.6% of staff are satisfied, overall, with CASA. See Part 5 for more information on our people.

Staff training days.

Target: 10.4

In 2002–03 there was an average of 3.9 training days per employee, which was down from 5.3 in the previous year and well below target.

The target has been in place for a number of years and was set at a time when reliable data was not available. We will be reviewing it in 2003–04 to identify a more realistic level that is in keeping with industry and public sector norms.

Note: The figures do not include flying training. These data are collected manually and may not reflect total training days. A training administration database will be implemented during 2003–04 to comprehensively collect training data.

Unplanned absenteeism.

Target: 2%

The annual average for unplanned absenteeism in CASA was 3% against an annual target of 2%.

This was an increase over the previous year's result of 1.9%, but CASA's result remains well within industry and public sector norms. See Part 5 for more information on our people.

Note: Unplanned absence includes sick, family and special leave.

Staff turnover.

Target range: 5—10%

CASA's rate of staff turnover improved this year with an annual average of 5.98% compared with 8.28% last year. See Part 5 for more information on our people.

Staff participation in the Performance Communication Scheme.

Target: 100%

We received positive feedback from an evaluation of implementation of the Scheme conducted in April 2003: 92% of respondents indicated they were 'quite satisfied' to 'extremely satisfied' with the discussions and development of their Plan.

There have been no official reports of staff not participating in the Scheme; however, the survey indicated that 8% of respondents were yet to start development of their Plan. See Part 5 for more information on our people.

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